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dc.creatorTrotter, Griffinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:10:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:10:00Zen
dc.date.created2003-06en
dc.date.issued2003-06en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1076/jmep.28.3.339.14588en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy 2003 June; 28(3): 339-357en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Holding+civic+medicine+accountable:+will+Morreim's+liability+scheme+work+in+a+disaster?&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy+&volume=28&issue=3&spage=339-357&date=2003-06&au=Trotter,+Griffinen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1076/jmep.28.3.339.14588en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1000300en
dc.description.abstractIn Holding Health Care Accountable, E. Haavi Morreim differentiates between duties of expertise and resource duties, arguing for tort liability respecting the former and contract liability respecting the latter. Though Morreim's book addresses ordinary clinical medicine, her liability scheme may also be relevant elsewhere. Focusing on disaster medicine, and especially the medical management of violent mass disasters (e.g., where terrorists have deployed weapons of mass destruction), I argue in this essay that Morreim's classification of duties still fits, but that it is difficult to hold government powers accountable for their many resource and expertise duties. This difficulty is compounded by political arrangements that foist under-funded mandates for disaster services on healthcare providers. As a result of such arrangements, hospitals and clinicians are prone to liability for expenditures and clinical interventions that are beyond their scope. This problem can be mitigated, I argue, by examining and clarifying the apparent social compact between society and healthcare.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:260149en
dc.subjectClassificationen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHospitalsen
dc.subjectLiabilityen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subject.classificationAllocation of Health Care Resourcesen
dc.subject.classificationWaren
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care for Particular Diseases or Groupsen
dc.titleHolding Civic Medicine Accountable: Will Morreim's Liability Scheme Work in a Disaster?en
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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