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dc.creatorLeino-Kilpi, Helenaen
dc.creatorValimaki, Marittaen
dc.creatorDassen, Theoen
dc.creatorGasull, Mariaen
dc.creatorLemonidou, Chryssoulaen
dc.creatorSchopp, Anjaen
dc.creatorScott, P. Anneen
dc.creatorArndt, Marianneen
dc.creatorKaljonen, Anneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:13:36Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:13:36Zen
dc.date.created2003-01en
dc.date.issued2003-01en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1191/0969733003ne571oaen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNursing Ethics 2003 January; 10(1): 18-27en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Perceptions+of+autonomy,+privacy+and+informed+consent+in+the+care+of+elderly+people+in+five+European+countries:+general+overview&title=Nursing+Ethics+&volume=10&issue=1&spage=18-27&date=2003-01&au=Leino-Kilpi,+Helena;+Valimaki,+Maritta;+Dassen,+Theo;+Gasull,+Maria;+Lemonidou,+Chryssoula;+Schopp,+Anja;+Scott,+P.+Anne;+Arndt,+Marianne;+Kaljonen,+Anneen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1191/0969733003ne571oaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1003657en
dc.description.abstractEthical issues in the care of elderly people have been identified in many countries. We report the findings of a comparative research project funded by the European Commission, which took place between 1998 and 2001. The project explored the issues of autonomy (part I), privacy (part II) and informed consent (part III) in nursing practice. Data were collected from elderly residents/patients (n = 573) and nursing staff (n = 887) in five European countries: Finland, Spain, Greece, Germany and the UK (Scotland). Questionnaires were used as the data collection tool (self-completion questionnaires for staff, structured interviews for the elderly participants). Four basic nursing interventions in the care of elderly people were targeted: hygiene, fluid intake and nutrition, medication, and elimination. The data were analysed statistically. The results indicated differences within all five countries between staff and patient perceptions of autonomy, privacy and informed consent. There were also similar differences between individual countries. Conclusions were reached concerning practice, education and research. This is the first of a set of five articles published together in this issue of Nursing Ethics in which the results of this comparative research project are presented.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:255779en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectData Collectionen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectInterviewsen
dc.subjectNursing Ethicsen
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectQuestionnairesen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationConfidentialityen
dc.subject.classificationInternational and Political Dimensions of Biology and Medicineen
dc.subject.classificationInformed Consenten
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care Programs for the Ageden
dc.titlePerceptions of Autonomy, Privacy and Informed Consent in the Care of Elderly People in Five European Countries: General Overviewen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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