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dc.creatorEveleth, Daniel M.en
dc.creatorPillutla, Arunen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:14:45Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:14:45Zen
dc.date.created2003en
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1207/S15327019EB1302_03en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationEthics and Behavior 2003; 13(2): 153-172en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Task+demands,+task+interest,+and+task+performance:+implications+for+human+subjects+research+and+practicing+what+we+preach&title=Ethics+and+Behavior+&volume=13&issue=2&spage=153-172&date=2003&au=Eveleth,+Daniel+M.;+Pillutla,+Arunen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15327019EB1302_03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1005497en
dc.description.abstractThrough the continuous investigation of humans in organizations, we have learned much about motivation, attitudes, and performance. For example, Yukl and others have helped increase our understanding of influence tactics and the effect they have on the performance of subordinates, supervisors, and peers. Some tactics (and combinations of tactics) lead to resistance, some lead to compliance, and some lead to commitment. In this study, we raise the question of whether or not we incorporate our knowledge of these research findings into the design, implementation, and interpretation of our own research studies that require the participation of human subjects. In a survey of 134 subjects from a previous social science study, we found that performance varied across the sample, consistent with the concepts of resistance, compliance, and commitment. In addition, the variance in performance could be explained, in part, by task interest and perceived task demands. Implications are discussed.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:253004en
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectKnowledgeen
dc.subjectMotivationen
dc.subjectOrganizationsen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectResearch Findingsen
dc.subjectScienceen
dc.subjectSurveyen
dc.subject.classificationSociology of Health Careen
dc.subject.classificationHuman Experimentation Policy Guidelines / Institutional Review Boardsen
dc.subject.classificationInformed Consent or Human Experimentationen
dc.subject.classificationBehavioral Researchen
dc.titleTask Demands, Task Interest, and Task Performance: Implications for Human Subjects Research and Practicing What We Preachen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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