Show simple item record

dc.creatorTaylor, James Staceyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:30:08Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:30:08Zen
dc.date.created2002en
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1111/japp.2002.19.issue-3en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Applied Philosophy 2002; 19(3): 273-285en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Autonomy,+constraining+options,+and+organ+sales&title=Journal+of+Applied+Philosophy+&volume=19&issue=3&spage=273-285&date=2002&au=Taylor,+James+Staceyen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/japp.2002.19.issue-3en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1014212en
dc.description.abstractAlthough there continues to be a chronic shortage of transplant organs the suggestion that we should try to alleviate it through allowing a current market in them continues to be morally condemned, usually on the grounds that such a market would undermine the autonomy of those who would participate in it as vendors. Against this objection Gerald Dworkin has argued that such markets would enhance the autonomy of the vendors through providing them with more options, thus enabling them to exercise a greater degree of control over their bodies. Paul Hughes and T.L. Zutlevics have recently criticized Dworkin's argument, arguing that the option to sell an organ is unusual in that it is an autonomy- undermining "constraining option" whose presence in a person's choice set is likely to undermine her autonomy rather than enhance it. I argue that although Hughes' and Zutlevics' arguments are both innovative and persuasive they are seriously flawed -- and that allowing a market in human organs is more likely to enhance vendor autonomy than diminish it. Thus, given that autonomy is the preeminent value in contemporary medical ethics this provides a strong prima facie case for recognizing the moral legitimacy of such markets.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:239717en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectMedical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationDonation / Procurement of Organs and Tissuesen
dc.subject.classificationBusiness Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationEconomics of Health Careen
dc.titleAutonomy, Constraining Options, and Organ Salesen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2019 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885