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dc.creatorTassy, Sébastienen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:33:11Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:33:11Zen
dc.date.created2011-10en
dc.date.issued2011-10en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1051/medsci/20112710018en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMédecine sciences : M/S 2011 Oct; 27(10): 889-94en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1015460en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1051/medsci/20112710018en
dc.description.abstractRecently, cognitive neuroscience has shed new light on our understanding of the neural underpinning of humans' morality. These findings allow for a fundamental questioning and rethinking of the alleged dichotomy between reason and emotion, that has profoundly shaped both moral philosophy and moral psychology. Functional neuroimaging and neuropsychology studies have provided strong arguments favoring a dynamic and interdependent interaction between rational and emotional processes in the brain. Yet another fundamental issue remains largely unexplored: the dissociation between certain behaviours and the moral judgments that seem to precede them. The importance of this dissociation was highlighted in a study of psychopathic patients during which they preserved their moral judgments while frequently engaging in completely non moral behaviour. Such dissociation could result from the cognitive difference between an objective moral judgement with no personal consequence, and a subjective behavioural choice that has effective or potential personal consequences. Consequently, the results of moral dilemma experiments would differ widely depending whether they explore objective or subjective moral evaluations. That these evaluations involve two distinct neural processes should be taken into account when exploring the neural bases of human morality.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languagefren
dc.sourceeweb:340905en
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectMoralityen
dc.subjectNeurosciencesen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationNeurosciences and Mental Health Therapiesen
dc.subject.classificationBehavioral Researchen
dc.titleLa nécessité de distinguer le jugement et le choix subjectif dans les neurosciences cognitives de la moraleen
dc.title.alternativeOn the necessity to distinguish judgment from subjective choice in the cognitive neuroscience of moralityen
dc.title.alternativeenen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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