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dc.creatorRosen, Laraen
dc.creatorVining, Aidan Ren
dc.creatorWeimer, David Len
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:33:35Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:33:35Zen
dc.date.created2011-08en
dc.date.issued2011-08en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1215/03616878-1334695en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of health politics, policy and law 2011 Aug; 36(4): 717-55en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Addressing+the+shortage+of+kidneys+for+transplantation:+purchase+and+allocation+through+chain+auctions.&title=Journal+of+health+politics,+policy+and+law+&volume=36&issue=4&date=2011-08&au=Rosen,+Lara;+Vining,+Aidan+R;+Weimer,+David+Len
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1215/03616878-1334695en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1016065en
dc.description.abstractTransplantation is generally the treatment of choice for those suffering from kidney failure. Not only does transplantation offer improved quality of life and increased longevity relative to dialysis, it also reduces end-stage renal disease program expenditures, providing savings to Medicare. Unfortunately, the waiting list for kidney transplants is long, growing, and unlikely to be substantially reduced by increases in the recovery of cadaveric kidneys. Another approach is to obtain more kidneys through payment to living "donors," or vendors. Such direct commodification, in which a price is placed on kidneys, has generally been opposed by medical ethicists. Much of the ethical debate, however, has been in terms of commodification through market exchange. Recognizing that there are different ethical concerns associated with the purchase of kidneys and their allocation, it is possible to design a variety of institutional arrangements for the commodification of kidneys that pose different sets of ethical concerns. We specify three such alternatives in detail sufficient to allow an assessment of their likely consequences and we compare these alternatives to current policy in terms of the desirable goals of promoting human dignity, equity, efficiency, and fiscal advantage. This policy analysis leads us to recommend that kidneys be purchased at administered prices by a nonprofit organization and allocated to the transplant centers that can organize the longest chains of transplants involving willing-but-incompatible donor-patient dyads.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:340277en
dc.subjectAlternativesen
dc.subjectCommodificationen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectDonorsen
dc.subjectEthicistsen
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectHuman Dignityen
dc.subjectKidneysen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectPolicy Analysisen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectSufferingen
dc.subjectTransplantationen
dc.subject.classificationKidney Transplantationen
dc.subject.classificationDonation / Procurement of Organs and Tissuesen
dc.subject.classificationAllocation of Organs and Tissuesen
dc.subject.classificationEconomics of Health Careen
dc.titleAddressing the Shortage of Kidneys for Transplantation: Purchase and Allocation Through Chain Auctionsen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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