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dc.creatorJensen, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:33:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:33:39Zen
dc.date.created2011-08en
dc.date.issued2011-08en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1136/jme.2010.041731en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of medical ethics 2011 Aug; 37(8): 479-82en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=A+Kantian+argument+against+comparatively+advantageous+genetic+modification.&title=Journal+of+medical+ethics+&volume=37&issue=8&date=2011-08&au=Jensen,+Daviden
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2010.041731en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1016176en
dc.description.abstractThe genetic modification of children is becoming a more likely possibility given our rapid progress in medical technologies. I argue, from a broadly Kantian point of view, that at least one kind of such modification-modification by a parent for the sake of a child's comparative advantage-is not rationally justified. To argue this, I first characterize a necessary condition on reasons and rational justification: what is a reason for an agent to do an action in one set of circumstances must be a reason for any in those circumstances to do the action. I then show that comparatively advantageous genetic modification violates this principle since a child's "getting ahead" through genetic modification cannot be rationally justified unless other children also could receive the modification, thus rendering the advantage useless. Finally, I consider the major objection to this CONCLUSION: it seems to disallow all cases of a parent's helping a child get ahead, something that parents normally engage in with their children. I argue that typical practices of developing a comparative advantage in a child, as well as practices of societal competition in general, do not conflict because they involve circumstances that mitigate the universal character of reasons. Many ordinary cases of competitive advantage that we think of as unjust, in fact, can be explained by my argument.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:340165en
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationReproduction / Reproductive Technologiesen
dc.subject.classificationEugenicsen
dc.titleA Kantian Argument Against Comparatively Advantageous Genetic Modificationen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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