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dc.creatorTaylor, Ann T Sen
dc.creatorRogers, Jill Cellarsen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:33:51Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:33:51Zen
dc.date.created2011-07en
dc.date.issued2011-07en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1002/bmb.20521en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBiochemistry and molecular biology education : a bimonthly publication of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 2011 Jul; 39(4): 253-60en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+ethical+implications+of+genetic+testing+in+the+classroom.&title=Biochemistry+and+molecular+biology+education+:+a+bimonthly+publication+of+the+International+Union+of+Biochemistry+and+Molecular+Biology+&volume=39&issue=4&date=2011-07&au=Taylor,+Ann+T+S;+Rogers,+Jill+Cellarsen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmb.20521en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1016494en
dc.description.abstractThe development of classroom experiments where students examine their own DNA is frequently described as an innovative teaching practice. Often these experiences involve students analyzing their genes for various polymorphisms associated with disease states, like an increased risk for developing cancer. Such experiments can muddy the distinction between classroom investigation and medical testing. Although the goals and issues surrounding classroom genotyping do not directly align with those of clinical testing, instructors can use the guidelines and standards established by the medical genetics community when evaluating the ethics of human genotyping. We developed a laboratory investigation and discussion which allowed undergraduate science students to explore current DNA manipulation techniques to isolate their p53 gene, followed by a dialogue probing the ethical implications of examining their sample for various polymorphisms. Students never conducted genotyping on their samples because of the ethical concerns presented in this paper, so the discussion replaced the actual genetic testing in the class. A science faculty member led the laboratory portion, while a genetic counselor facilitated the discussion of the ethical concepts underlying genetic counseling: autonomy, beneficence, confidentiality, and justice. In their final papers, students demonstrated an understanding of the practice guidelines established by the genetics community and acknowledged the ethical considerations inherent in p53 genotyping. Given the burgeoning market for personalized medicine, teaching undergraduates about the psychosocial and ethical dimensions of human genetic testing is important and timely. Moreover, incorporating a genetic counselor in the classroom discussion provided a rich and dynamic discussion of human genetic testing.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:339830en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBeneficenceen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectCounselingen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectDNAen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFacultyen
dc.subjectGenesen
dc.subjectGenetic Counselingen
dc.subjectGenetic Testingen
dc.subjectGeneticsen
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectGuidelinesen
dc.subjectJusticeen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectMedical Geneticsen
dc.subjectPersonalized Medicineen
dc.subjectPractice Guidelinesen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectScienceen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectStudentsen
dc.subject.classificationBioethics Educationen
dc.subject.classificationConfidentialityen
dc.subject.classificationGenetic Counseling / Prenatal Diagnosisen
dc.subject.classificationGenetic Screening / Genetic Testingen
dc.titleThe Ethical Implications of Genetic Testing in the Classroomen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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