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dc.creatorWendler, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:34:11Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:34:11Zen
dc.date.created2011-06en
dc.date.issued2011-06en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1007/s11017-011-9176-yen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTheoretical medicine and bioethics 2011 Jun; 32(3): 161-80en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=What+we+worry+about+when+we+worry+about+the+ethics+of+clinical+research.&title=Theoretical+medicine+and+bioethics+&volume=32&issue=3&date=2011-06&au=Wendler,+Daviden
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11017-011-9176-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1017103en
dc.description.abstractClinical research is thought to be ethically problematic and is subject to extensive regulation and oversight. Despite frequent endorsement of this view, there has been almost no systematic evaluation of why clinical research might be ethically problematic. As a result, it is difficult to determine whether the regulations to which clinical research is subject address the ethical concerns it raises. Commentators who consider this question at all tend to assume that clinical research is ethically problematic because it exposes some individuals to risks for the benefit of others. Yet, many other activities that expose some individuals to risks for the benefit of others are not subject to extensive regulation and oversight. This difference raises the question of whether clinical research is distinct from these activities in normatively relevant ways and, if so, what implications this difference (or differences) has for how clinical research should be regulated and conducted. The present manuscript attempts to answer this question by comparing clinical research to two other activities that expose some individuals to risks for the benefit of others. This comparison highlights an aspect of clinical research which has received relatively little attention, namely, the active role investigators play in exposing subjects to risks. I argue that this aspect explains much of the ethical concern expressed regarding clinical research. I end by considering the normative significance of this feature and the implications it has for how clinical research should be regulated and conducted.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:339189en
dc.subjectClinical Researchen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectInvestigatorsen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subject.classificationHuman Experimentationen
dc.subject.classificationHuman Experimentation Policy Guidelines / Institutional Review Boardsen
dc.titleWhat We Worry About When We Worry About the Ethics of Clinical Researchen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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