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dc.creatorClausen, Jensen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:40:21Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:40:21Zen
dc.date.created2010-10en
dc.date.issued2010-10en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07421.xen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationThe European journal of neuroscience 2010 Oct; 32(7): 1152-62en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Ethical+brain+stimulation+-+neuroethics+of+deep+brain+stimulation+in+research+and+clinical+practice.&title=The+European+journal+of+neuroscience+&volume=32&issue=7&date=2010-10&au=Clausen,+Jensen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07421.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1021024en
dc.description.abstractDeep brain stimulation (DBS) is a clinically established procedure for treating severe motor symptoms in patients suffering from end-stage Parkinson's disease, dystonia and essential tremor. Currently, it is tested for further indications including psychiatric disorders like major depression and a variety of other diseases. However, ethical issues of DBS demand continuing discussion. Analysing neuroethical and clinical literature, five major topics concerning the ethics of DBS in clinical practice were identified: thorough examination and weighing of risks and benefits; selecting patients fairly; protecting the health of children in paediatric DBS; special issues concerning patients' autonomy; and the normative impact of quality of life measurements. In exploring DBS for further applications, additionally, issues of research ethics have to be considered. Of special importance in this context are questions such as what additional value is generated by the research, how to realise scientific validity, which patients should be included, and how to achieve an acceptable risk-benefit ratio. Patients' benefit is central for ethical evaluation. This criterion can outweigh very serious side-effects, and can make DBS appropriate even in paediatrics. Because standard test procedures evade central aspects of patients' benefits, measuring quality of life should be supplemented by open in-depth interviews to provide a more adequate picture of patients' post-surgical situation. To examine its entire therapeutic potential, further research in DBS is needed. Studies should be based on solid scientific hypotheses and proceed cautiously to benefit severely suffering patients without putting them to undue risks.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:334916en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectInterviewsen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectLiteratureen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectResearch Ethicsen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectSufferingen
dc.subject.classificationNeurosciences and Mental Health Therapiesen
dc.subject.classificationElectrical Stimulation of the Brainen
dc.subject.classificationHuman Experimentation Policy Guidelines / Institutional Review Boardsen
dc.titleEthical Brain Stimulation - Neuroethics of Deep Brain Stimulation in Research and Clinical Practiceen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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