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dc.creatorChang, Yuanmayen
dc.creatorHuang, Chin-Fengen
dc.creatorLin, Chia-Chinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:41:10Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:41:10Zen
dc.date.created2010-07en
dc.date.issued2010-07en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1177/0969733010364893en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNursing ethics 2010 Jul; 17(4): 445-55en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Do-not-resuscitate+orders+for+critically+ill+patients+in+intensive+care.&title=Nursing+ethics+&volume=17&issue=4&date=2010-07&au=Chang,+Yuanmay;+Huang,+Chin-Feng;+Lin,+Chia-Chinen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0969733010364893en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1022441en
dc.description.abstractEnd-of-life decision making frequently occurs in the intensive care unit (ICU). There is a lack of information on how a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order affects treatments received by critically ill patients in ICUs. The objectives of this study were: (1) to compare the use of life support therapies between patients with a DNR order and those without; (2) to examine life support therapies prior to and after the issuance of a DNR order; and (3) to determine the clinical factors that influence the initiation of a DNR order in ICUs in Taiwan. A prospective, descriptive, and correlational study was conducted. A total of 202 patients comprising 133 (65.8%) who had a DNR order, and 69 (34.1%) who did not, participated in this study. In the last 48 hours of their lives, patients who had a DNR order were less likely to receive life support therapies than those who did not have a DNR order. Older age, being unmarried, the presence of an adult child as a surrogate decision maker, a perceived inability to survive ultimate discharge from the ICU, and longer hospitalization in the ICU were significant predictors of issuing a DNR order for critically ill patients. This study will draw attention to how, when, and by whom, critically ill patients' preferences about DNR are elicited and honored.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:333183en
dc.subjectCritically Illen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subject.classificationProlongation of Life and Euthanasiaen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care for Particular Diseases or Groupsen
dc.titleDo-Not-Resuscitate Orders for Critically Ill Patients in Intensive Careen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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