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dc.creatorWeber, Ashleyen
dc.creatorMills, Lisaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:41:14Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:41:14Zen
dc.date.created2010-06-15en
dc.date.issued2010-06-15en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHealth and human rights 2010 June 15; 12(1): 109-22en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=A+one-time-only+combination:+Emergency+medicine+exports+and+the+TRIPS+agreement+under+Canada's+access+to+medicines+regime.&title=Health+and+human+rights+&volume=12&issue=1&date=2010-06&au=Weber,+Ashley;+Mills,+Lisaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1022590en
dc.description.abstractIn 2008, a Canadian generic pharmaceutical firm, Apotex Inc. (Apotex), shipped 7 million doses of antiretroviral drugs to Rwanda for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. While this event may be seen as a positive outcome of international patent changes that facilitate the fulfillment of health as a human right, the fact that there has been only one shipment of medication in response to these changes highlights the difficulties with both the Canadian legislation and with the international decisions that it implements. The shipment was authorized under Canada's Access to Medicines Regime (CAMR), which implements the World Trade Organization (WTO) General Council Decision (the Decision), made in 2003, to permit someone other than the patent holder to manufacture a lower-cost version of a patented drug or medical device for export to developing countries that do not have the capacity to manufacture such products. The Decision requires that the developing country announce its intention to use this mechanism, to specify the expected quantity of drugs to be supplied, and to issue a compulsory license for the drugs. The requirement of notification in particular may render developing countries vulnerable to pressure from pharmaceutical firms. Neither the mechanism created by the Decision nor Canadian legislation implementing it have facilitated the export of generic medicines to developing countries. To date, the Canadian shipment is the only one to have occurred using the WTO mechanism.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:333001en
dc.subjectAidsen
dc.subjectDeveloping Countriesen
dc.subjectDrugsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectIntentionen
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectNotificationen
dc.subject.classificationRight to Health Careen
dc.subject.classificationDrugs and Drug Industryen
dc.subject.classificationInternational and Political Dimensions of Biology and Medicineen
dc.subject.classificationAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome or HIV Infectionen
dc.titleA One-Time-Only Combination: Emergency Medicine Exports and the TRIPS Agreement Under Canada's Access to Medicines Regimeen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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