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dc.creatorBalabanova, Ekaterinaen
dc.creatorSimonstein, Fridaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:41:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:41:16Zen
dc.date.created2010-06en
dc.date.issued2010-06en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1007/s10728-009-0123-2en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHealth care analysis : HCA : journal of health philosophy and policy 2010 Jun; 18(2): 188-202en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Assisted+reproduction:+a+comparative+review+of+IVF+policies+in+two+pro-natalist+countries.&title=Health+care+analysis+:+HCA+:+journal+of+health+philosophy+and+policy+&volume=18&issue=2&date=2010-06&au=Balabanova,+Ekaterina;+Simonstein,+Fridaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10728-009-0123-2en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1022640en
dc.description.abstractPolicies on reproduction have become an increasingly important tool for governments seeking to meet the so-called demographic 'challenge' created by the combination of low fertility and lengthening life expectancies. However, the tension between the state and the market in health care is present in all countries around the world due to the scare resources available and the understandable importance of the health issues. The field of assisted reproduction, as part of the health care system, is affected by this tension with both-the state's and the market's involvements-carrying important implications. Bulgaria and Israel share the same size of population, are markedly paternalistic and both have strong pro-natalist cultures by which large families are expected. For a range of reasons the two countries contrast sharply, however, in terms of their capacity to intervene in the health system, and also in terms of the political will to act on matters of reproduction. This paper examines how assisted reproduction, as reflected by present policies in both countries, influences women's welfare and considers whose interests the practices of assisted reproduction in these countries actually serve. By reviewing some of the present data on women's status in Bulgaria and Israel and assessing both states' policies and involvement in assisted reproduction this paper helps to identify some of the intended and unintended consequences of assisted reproduction policies in different countries.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:332932en
dc.subjectFertilityen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectIVFen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectReproductionen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Careen
dc.subject.classificationIn Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transferen
dc.subject.classificationInternational and Political Dimensions of Biology and Medicineen
dc.titleAssisted Reproduction: A Comparative Review of IVF Policies in Two Pro-Natalist Countriesen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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