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dc.creatorJansen, Lynn A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:42:25Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:42:25Zen
dc.date.created2010-02en
dc.date.issued2010-02en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1093/jmp/jhp056en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy 2010 February; 35(1): 19-31en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Disambiguating+clinical+intentions:+the+ethics+of+palliative+sedation.&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy+&volume=35&issue=1&date=2010-02&au=Jansen,+Lynn+A.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmp/jhp056en
dc.identifier.urihttp://timetravel.mementoweb.org/memento/2010/http://jmp.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol35/issue1/en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1024582en
dc.description.abstractIt is often claimed that the intentions of physicians are multiple, ambiguous, and uncertain-at least with respect to end-of-life care. This claim provides support for the conclusion that the principle of double effect is of little or no value as a guide to end-of-life pain management. This paper critically discusses this claim. It argues that proponents of the claim fail to distinguish two different senses of "intention," and that, as a result, they are led to exaggerate the extent to which clinical intentions in end-of-life contexts are ambiguous and uncertain. It argues further that physicians, like others who make life and death decisions, have a duty to get clear on what their intentions are. Finally, it argues that even if the principle of double effect should be rejected, clinical intentions remain ethically significant because they condition the meaning of extraordinary clinical interventions, such as that of palliative sedation.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:330230en
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectDouble Effecten
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectIntentionen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationDrugs and Drug Industryen
dc.subject.classificationCare of the Dying Patienten
dc.titleDisambiguating Clinical Intentions: The Ethics of Palliative Sedationen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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