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dc.creatorOfori-Atta, Angelaen
dc.creatorCooper, Saraen
dc.creatorAkpalu, Brighten
dc.creatorOsei, Akwasien
dc.creatorDoku, Victoren
dc.creatorLund, Cricken
dc.creatorFlisher, Alanen
dc.creatorThe Mhapp Research Programme Consortium,en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:45:18Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:45:18Zen
dc.date.created2010en
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifierdoi:10.3109/09540261.2010.536150en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationInternational review of psychiatry (Abingdon, England) 2010; 22(6): 589-98en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Common+understandings+of+women's+mental+illness+in+Ghana:+results+from+a+qualitative+study.&title=International+review+of+psychiatry+&volume=22&issue=6&date=2010&au=Ofori-Atta,+Angela;+Cooper,+Sara;+Akpalu,+Bright;+Osei,+Akwasi;+Doku,+Victor;+Lund,+Crick;+Flisher,+Alan;+The+Mhapp+Research+Programme+Consortium,en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09540261.2010.536150en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1025601en
dc.description.abstractDespite the high rates of depression and anxiety disorders amongst women, the mental health of women is a neglected area, particularly in Africa. This study sought to explore what key stakeholders perceive as the main causes of mental illness in women in Ghana. Using qualitative methods, 81 semi-structured interviews and seven focus group discussions were conducted with 120 key stakeholders drawn from 5 of the 10 regions in Ghana. The analysis was undertaken using a grounded theory approach. Respondents attributed mental illness in women to a number of causes. These included women being the weaker sex, hormones, witchcraft, adultery, abuse and poverty. Explanations could be clustered under three broad categories: women's inherent vulnerability, witchcraft, and gender disadvantage. The way in which women's subordinate position within society may underpin their mental distress needs to be recognized and addressed. The results from this study offer opportunities to identify how policy can better recognize, accommodate and address the mental health needs of women in Ghana and other low-income African countries.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:328897en
dc.subjectAdulteryen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHormonesen
dc.subjectInterviewsen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectMental Illnessen
dc.subjectPovertyen
dc.subjectStakeholdersen
dc.subject.classificationNeurosciences and Mental Health Therapiesen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care Programs for Womenen
dc.titleCommon Understandings of Women's Mental Illness in Ghana: Results From a Qualitative Studyen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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