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dc.creatorVan Hilvoorde, Ivoen
dc.creatorLandeweerd, Laurensen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:45:18Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:45:18Zen
dc.date.created2010en
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifierdoi:10.3109/09638288.2010.491578en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationDisability and rehabilitation 2010; 32(26): 2222-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Enhancing+disabilities:+transhumanism+under+the+veil+of+inclusion?&title=Disability+and+rehabilitation+&volume=32&issue=26&date=2010&au=Van+Hilvoorde,+Ivo;+Landeweerd,+Laurensen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2010.491578en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1025602en
dc.description.abstractTechnological developments for disabled athletes may facilitate their competition in standard elite sports. They raise intriguing philosophical questions that challenge dominant notions of body and normality. The case of 'bladerunner' Oscar Pistorius in particular is used to illustrate and defend 'transhumanist' ideologies that promote the use of technology to extend human capabilities. Some argue that new technologies will undermine the sharp contrast between the athlete as a cultural hero and icon and the disabled person that needs extra attention or care; the one exemplary of the peak of normality, human functioning at its best, the other representing a way of coping with the opposite. Do current ways of classification do justice to the performances of disabled athletes? The case of Oscar Pistorius will be used to further illustrate the complexities of these questions, in particular when related to notions of normality and extraordinary performances. Pistorius' desire to become part of 'normal' elite sport may be interpreted as an expression of a right to 'inclusion' or 'integration', but at the same time it reproduces new inequalities and asymmetries between performances of able and dis-abled athletes: we propose that if one accepts that Pistorius should compete in the 'regular' Olympic Games, this would paradoxically underline the differences between able and disabled and it would reproduce the current order and hierarchy between able and disabled bodies.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:328896en
dc.subjectClassificationen
dc.subjectJusticeen
dc.subjectNormalityen
dc.subjectSportsen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.subjectTranshumanismen
dc.subject.classificationEnhancementen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care for Particular Diseases or Groupsen
dc.titleEnhancing Disabilities: Transhumanism Under the Veil of Inclusion?en
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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