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dc.creatorSommer, Matthew Hen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:45:18Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:45:18Zen
dc.date.created2010en
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1163/9789004271890en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationLate imperial China = Ch?ing shih wen t?i 2010; 31(2): 97-165en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Abortion+in+late+Imperial+China:+routine+birth+control+or+crisis+intervention?&title=Late+imperial+China+=+Ch?ing+shih+wen+t?i+&volume=31&issue=2&date=2010&au=Sommer,+Matthew+Hen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1163/9789004271890en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1025608en
dc.description.abstractIn late imperial China, a number of purported methods of abortion were known; but who actually attempted abortion and under what circumstances? Some historians have suggested that abortion was used for routine birth control, which presupposes that known methods were safe, reliable, and readily available. This paper challenges the qualitative evidence on which those historians have relied, and presents new evidence from Qing legal sources and modern medical reports to argue that traditional methods of abortion (the most common being abortifacient drugs) were dangerous, unreliable, and often cost a great deal of money. Therefore, abortion in practice was an emergency intervention in a crisis: either a medical crisis, in which pregnancy threatened a woman's health, or a social crisis, in which pregnancy threatened to expose a woman's extramarital sexual relations. Moreover, abortion was not necessarily available even to women who wanted one.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:328889en
dc.subjectBirth Controlen
dc.subjectDrugsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectSexual Relationsen
dc.subject.classificationHistory of Health Ethics / Bioethicsen
dc.subject.classificationAbortionen
dc.titleAbortion in Late Imperial China: Routine Birth Control or Crisis Intervention?en
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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