Show simple item record

dc.creatorShaw, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:45:49Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:45:49Zen
dc.date.created2009-11en
dc.date.issued2009-11en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1111/j.1467-8519.2009.01760.xen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioethics 2009 November; 23(9): 515-521en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Cryoethics:+seeking+life+after+death.&title=Bioethics+&volume=23&issue=9&date=2009-11&au=Shaw,+Daviden
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8519.2009.01760.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://timetravel.mementoweb.org/memento/2009/http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122612825/issueen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1026492en
dc.description.abstractCryonic suspension is a relatively new technology that offers those who can afford it the chance to be 'frozen' for future revival when they reach the ends of their lives. This paper will examine the ethical status of this technology and whether its use can be justified. Among the arguments against using this technology are: it is 'against nature', and would change the very concept of death; no friends or family of the 'freezee' will be left alive when he is revived; the considerable expense involved for the freezee and the future society that will revive him; the environmental cost of maintaining suspension; those who wish to use cryonics might not live life to the full because they would economize in order to afford suspension; and cryonics could lead to premature euthanasia in order to maximize chances of success. Furthermore, science might not advance enough to ever permit revival, and reanimation might not take place due to socio-political or catastrophic reasons. Arguments advanced by proponents of cryonics include: the potential benefit to society; the ability to cheat death for at least a few more years; the prospect of immortality if revival is successful; and all the associated benefits that delaying or avoiding dying would bring. It emerges that it might be imprudent not to use the technology, given the relatively minor expense involved and the potential payoff. An adapted and more persuasive version of Pascal's Wager is presented and offered as a conclusive argument in favour of utilizing cryonic suspension.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:327752en
dc.subjectCryonic Suspensionen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectEuthanasiaen
dc.subjectFriendsen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectScienceen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.subject.classificationEnhancementen
dc.subject.classificationProlongation of Life and Euthanasiaen
dc.titleCryoethics: Seeking Life After Deathen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2019 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885