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dc.creatorTomasini, Florisen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:45:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:45:56Zen
dc.date.created2009-10en
dc.date.issued2009-10en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1111/j.1467-8519.2008.00665.xen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioethics 2009 October; 23(8): 441-449en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Is+post-mortem+harm+possible?+Understanding+death+harm+and+grief.&title=Bioethics+&volume=23&issue=8&date=2009-10&au=Tomasini,+Florisen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8519.2008.00665.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://timetravel.mementoweb.org/memento/2009/http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122577114/issueen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1026711en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this article is not to affirm or deny particular philosophical positions, but to explore the limits of intelligibility about what post-mortem harm means, especially in the light of improper post-mortem procedures at Bristol and Alder Hey hospitals in the late 1990s. The parental claims of post-mortem harm to dead children at Alder Hey Hospital are reviewed from five different philosophical perspectives, eventually settling on a crucial difference of perspective about how we understand harm to the dead. On the one hand there is the broadly 'analytical' tradition(1) of thinking that predicates the notion of harm on the basis of an existing subject. Since the dead are non-existent persons, it makes little sense to view the dead as being harmed. On the other hand, there is a phenomenological perspective, where the dead, in respect to the experience of grief, are existentially absent. This forms the basis that it is possible to harm grieving parent's experiences of how their dead are treated. The article ends with a short examination of what harming the dead implies for traditional bioethical concerns, namely, obtaining informed consent from significant others when planning medical research on the newly dead.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:327484en
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectFormsen
dc.subjectHarmen
dc.subjectHospitalsen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectMedical Researchen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationValue / Quality of Lifeen
dc.subject.classificationInformed Consent or Human Experimentationen
dc.subject.classificationDonation / Procurement of Organs and Tissuesen
dc.subject.classificationResearch on Special Populationsen
dc.subject.classificationAttitudes Toward Deathen
dc.subject.classificationFamily Attitudes Toward Deathen
dc.subject.classificationMinors / Parental Consenten
dc.titleIs Post-Mortem Harm Possible? Understanding Death Harm and Griefen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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