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dc.creatorJohannessen, Kai Ingolfen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:46:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:46:20Zen
dc.date.created2009-08en
dc.date.issued2009-08en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1093/cb/cbp008en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationChristian Bioethics 2009 August; 15(2): 154-172en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Justice+in+care+with+special+regard+to+long-term+care&title=Christian+Bioethics+&volume=15&issue=2&date=2009-08&au=Johannessen,+Kai+Ingolfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cb/cbp008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1027391en
dc.description.abstractIn this article, the relevance of justice in care is discussed, with special regard to long-term care. After a short introduction laying out the conceptual framework of justice and care, followed by an exploration of some special challenges within long-term care, this article consists of two main parts. The first part deals with justice as a general (secular) philosophical phenomenon and draws especially upon principles of justice as developed by John Rawls. Both the principle of fair equality of opportunity and the difference principle, according to which an unequal treatment may be justified, provided that those "worst off" benefit mostly and are relevant within the field of care. The feminist debate about an ethics of care is also considered since its more recent contributions offer interesting attempts to mediate between justice and care. The second part of the article introduces a Christian perspective on justice, with relevance for (long-term) care. From a Christian point of view, one will even more strongly than Rawls argue for a conception of justice, which gives priority to those worst off. It is also argued that justice and care converge in the practice of diakonia. Diakonia, in many traditions synonymous with the caring dimension of the church, always had a special focus on long-term care. In this kind of church-based practice, justice and care are reconciled.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:326629en
dc.subjectCaringen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectJusticeen
dc.subjectLong-Term Careen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationReligious Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationBioethicsen
dc.subject.classificationSexuality / Genderen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care for Particular Diseases or Groupsen
dc.titleJustice in Care -- With Special Regard to Long-Term Careen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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