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dc.creatorMiller, Franklin G.en
dc.creatorTruog, Robert D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:46:44Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:46:44Zen
dc.date.created2009-06en
dc.date.issued2009-06en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1353/ken.0.0282en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationKennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2009 June; 19(2): 185-193en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+incoherence+of+determining+death+by+neurological+criteria:+a+commentary+on+"Controversies+in+the+determination+of+death",+a+white+paper+by+the+President's+Council+on+Bioethics.&title=Kennedy+Institute+of+Ethics+Journal+&volume=19&issue=2&date=2009-06&au=Miller,+Franklin+G.;+Truog,+Robert+D.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1353/ken.0.0282en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/1028108en
dc.description.abstractTraditionally the cessation of breathing and heart beat has marked the passage from life to death. Shortly after death was determined, the body became a cold corpse, suitable for burial or cremation. Two technological changes in the second half of the twentieth century prompted calls for a new, or at least expanded, definition of death: the development of intensive care medicine, especially the use of mechanical ventilators, and the advent of successful transplantation of vital organs. Patients with profound neurological damage, leaving them incapable of breathing on their own and in an irreversible coma, could be maintained for some period of time with the aid of mechanical ventilation. The situation of these patients posed two ethical questions. Is it appropriate to stop life-sustaining treatment? If so, is it acceptable to retrieve vital organs for transplantation to save the lives of others before stopping treatment? In 1968, the Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death proposed that death could be determined on the basis of neurological criteria, thus providing a positive answer to these two questions (Ad Hoc Committee 1968). According to the position of this committee, patients diagnosed with the cessation of brain function are dead, despite the fact that they breathe and circulate blood with the aid of mechanical ventilation.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:325636en
dc.subjectBlooden
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectBrain Deathen
dc.subjectComaen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectDetermination of Deathen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectTransplantationen
dc.subjectVentilatorsen
dc.subject.classificationHistory of Health Ethics / Bioethicsen
dc.subject.classificationBioethics Commissions / Councilsen
dc.subject.classificationNeurosciences and Mental Health Therapiesen
dc.subject.classificationDefinition of Deathen
dc.titleThe Incoherence of Determining Death by Neurological Criteria: A Commentary on "Controversies in the Determination of Death", a White Paper by the President's Council on Bioethicsen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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