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Cover for Massacre as Method: The National Memorial Day for Nanjing Massacre Victims and China’s Drive for Regional Power
dc.contributor.advisorCha, Victor D.en
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-01T20:09:22Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-01T20:09:22Zen
dc.date.created2015en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2015en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1029858.tar;APT-ETAG: c715f009f8ebf62f7b79dd14b371ca44en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.A.en
dc.description.abstractIn December 2014, Chinese President Xi Jinping presided over China’s first state commemoration of the 1937 Nanjing Massacre. The decision to hold this event, made months prior in February at the National People’s Congress annual meeting, seems counterintuitive in light of China’s recent progress in deescalating tensions with Japan. However, this move was part of a strategy to reclaim national prestige and regional status through the assertion of historical claims. After tracing the establishment of the Nanjing Massacre Commemoration Day and exploring the particular significance of the Nanjing Massacre in Sino-Japanese relations, I propose four other benchmarks that demonstrate a larger bank of policies to achieve this goal. Though this decision may seem indicative of a strong current of domestic nationalism or China’s desire for contrition from Japan, I argue that neither alternative convincingly accounts for the timing or content of this push for regional status. China’s insistence on periodically reviving the Nanjing Massacre does not bode well for the future of Sino-Japanese relations.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent26 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceAsian Studiesen
dc.subjectChinaen
dc.subjectcommemorationen
dc.subjectNanjing Massacreen
dc.subjectnationalismen
dc.subjectpoweren
dc.subjectSino-Japanese relationsen
dc.subject.lcshAsia -- Researchen
dc.subject.lcshInternational relationsen
dc.subject.otherAsian studiesen
dc.subject.otherInternational relationsen
dc.titleMassacre as Method: The National Memorial Day for Nanjing Massacre Victims and China’s Drive for Regional Poweren
dc.typethesisen


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