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Cover for THE ROLE OF SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIO-EMOTIONAL SKILLS
dc.contributor.advisorRyan, Rebecca Men
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-27T16:05:37Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-27T16:05:37Zen
dc.date.created2016en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2016en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1040767.tar;APT-ETAG: cb7c8d27ee6c5a0b4510f8a57364e8daen
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionPh.D.en
dc.description.abstractAmerican public schools have long been the key policy mechanism for enhancing America’s human resources and for giving students the skills they need to be successful, contributing citizens in the complex, 21st century economy. Increasingly, these 21st century skills have been defined as not only academic competence but also as social and emotional skills, including the ability to inhibit impulses and delay gratification, to maintain a positive sense of self, to sustain healthy social relationships, and to set and achieve long-term goals -- likely because of their links to both short-term educational success and long-run well-being.en
dc.description.abstractThough evidence suggests that schools are able to enhance students’ social and emotional skills, it remains unclear how schools can best improve these important outcomes. This dissertation explores the role of emotional engagement with school, or students’ liking of, connection to, and sense of belonging in school, in promoting social and emotional development. The construct of school engagement has been previously associated with social and emotional outcomes, however this research has largely been conducted cross-sectionally with small, local samples, limiting its relevance for policy application. Moreover, no research has examined directly the role of federal education policy in shaping students’ engagement. This dissertation fills these gaps by using multiple large, national datasets and several analytic techniques to (1) rigorously asses whether there is a plausibly causal link between emotional engagement with school and socio-emotional outcomes, defined as delinquent behavior, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem, (2) determine if this relationship varies by student age, (3) determine whether this relationship varies as a function of family income, and (4) explore whether the enactment of No Child Left Behind impacted students’ emotional engagement with school.en
dc.description.abstractFindings suggest that the relationship between emotional engagement and socio-emotional outcomes is consistent across outcomes and moderate in size. This association decreases slightly as youth age, but does not vary by family income. However, findings also suggest that the consequential accountability systems enacted under No Child Left Behind eroded students’ engagement with school. These findings highlight the importance of students’ emotional connection to school, and have important implications for policymakers and educators working to implement the newly-authorized Every Student Succeeds Act.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent185 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourcePsychologyen
dc.subject.lcshPsychologyen
dc.subject.lcshEducationen
dc.subject.lcshPublic policyen
dc.subject.otherPsychologyen
dc.subject.otherEducationen
dc.subject.otherPublic policyen
dc.titleTHE ROLE OF SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIO-EMOTIONAL SKILLSen
dc.typethesisen


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