Show simple item record

Files in this item

Cover for Molecular basis of photoperiodic diapause in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
dc.contributor.advisorArmbruster, Peter Aen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-26T13:41:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-09-26T13:41:03Zen
dc.date.created2016en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2016en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1041813.tar;APT-ETAG: d6e2179c6e1484362c0a32589206d7aden
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionPh.D.en
dc.description.abstractMy dissertation examines the molecular basis of photoperiodic diapause in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, using high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. Photoperiodic diapause is a developmental arrest in response to the seasonal change in photoperiod. Diapause enables the insects to synchronize growth and reproduction with favorable conditions, and developmental arrest with harsh conditions, such as winter in the temperate zone. Previous studies from our laboratory have established extensive global transcriptional profiles of diapause in Ae. albopictus at the diapause preparation and the actual developmental arrest stages. My dissertation research has elucidated global transcriptional dynamics during the diapause induction phase that initiates the diapause program. I discovered that essential components of the circadian clock governing daily rhythmic gene expression are implicated in photoperiodic time measurement. Also, energy metabolism and offspring provisioning were discovered to be crucial physiological processes during diapause induction.en
dc.description.abstractI also compared and evaluated four common approaches to transcriptome assembly, using the extensive transcriptomic resources for Ae. albopictus and its recently published genome assembly. I recommended general guidelines for transcriptome assembly, especially for non-model organisms. These guidelines will help to establish consistent methodological standards for the research community conducting high-throughput sequencing studies, a rapidly expanding field of research.en
dc.description.abstractIn another study, I took advantage of a natural evolutionary experiment that has occurred between tropical and temperate populations of Ae. albopictus. Tropical populations do not undergo photoperiodic diapause whereas the temperate populations do. Therefore, crossing genetic backgrounds from distinct geographic regions of the same species allowed me to examine the genetic basis of photoperiodic diapause. I utilized a bulked segregant analysis coupled with RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify genomic regions associated with diapause. Using a novel approach to leverage the unique expression information provided by RNA-Seq, combined with traditional single nucleotide polymorphism discovery, I identified candidate genomic regions and candidate genes likely involved in regulating diapause. Overall, this research helps to fill in important gaps in our understanding of the molecular basis of diapause and provides candidate genes for further functional interrogations.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent191 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceBiologyen
dc.subjectAedes albopictusen
dc.subjectDiapauseen
dc.subjectDiapause inductionen
dc.subjectGenetic basisen
dc.subjectRNA-Seqen
dc.subjectTranscriptome assemblyen
dc.subject.lcshEcologyen
dc.subject.lcshBioinformaticsen
dc.subject.lcshGeneticsen
dc.subject.otherEcologyen
dc.subject.otherBioinformaticsen
dc.subject.otherGeneticsen
dc.titleMolecular basis of photoperiodic diapause in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictusen
dc.typethesisen
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-2466-4373en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record