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Cover for Cash on delivery: Results of a randomized experiment to promote maternal health care in Kenya
dc.creatoren
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dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T20:16:02Zen
dc.date.available2017-09-22T20:16:02Zen
dc.date.created2017-09en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1045078.tar;APT-ETAG: b87b488c755085a7017cc1f729623905; APT-DATE: 2017-10-31_10:33:04en-US
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dc.description.abstractIn an experimental setting in Kenya, we show that certain financial and informational interventions delivered over the mobile phone network can be highly effective in boosting facility delivery rates of poor, rural women. Vouchers covering the full cost of care increased facility delivery rates by one-third, but a small copayment reduced the effect to almost zero. Cash transfers sent over the mobile network and labeled as transport subsidies, had similarly large effects only if they were conditional on delivering in a facility. By contrast, unconditional transfers had no effect on health care utilization. In contrast, we find a government policy that simply made care free at the point of service had little effect on demand.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University Initiative on Innovation, Development and Evaluationen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesgui2de Working Paper Series;3en
dc.rightsAll rights reserved by the author. Please contact gui2de@georgetown.edu for information about permissions.en
dc.subjectKenyaen
dc.subjectfinanceen
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.subjectmaternal healthen
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trialen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectpovertyen
dc.titleCash on delivery: Results of a randomized experiment to promote maternal health care in Kenyaen
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