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Cover for Exploring a Change in Meditation Practice Using Noise-Canceling Headphones
dc.contributor.advisorSlota, Margaret
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-11T21:20:19Z
dc.date.available2018-01-11T21:20:19Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2017
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1048147.tar;APT-ETAG: f16b19049686270509e14bf1238ba6eb; APT-DATE: 2019-02-28_12:23:32en_US
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionD.N.P.
dc.description.abstractPerceived stress is a rising health issue related to daily stressors. Cumulative effects of stress have physical, mental, and emotional consequences. Meditation is a safe, self-care activity with demonstrated effectiveness in reducing stress. One impediment to successful meditation practice is the ability to maintain focus.
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this pilot study was to explore the use of noise-canceling headphones to increase attention during meditation and reduce stress levels. Specific aims were to 1) explore the effectiveness of two types of meditation on the ability to transition into a meditative state, and 2) explore the effectiveness of two types of meditation on perceived stress levels.
dc.description.abstractThe study was a mixed methods, crossover design. The sample consisted of employed adults, randomly divided into two groups. Two types of meditation were compared: 1) Zen Meditation and 2) a new method called Silent Heart Meditation, where noise-canceling headphone were utilized to eliminate external noise. One group practiced Zen meditation for the first two weeks and then Silent Heart for the next two weeks. The second group practiced Silent Heart for the first two weeks and then Zen for the next two weeks. Outcomes were measured using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), and a qualitative questionnaire.
dc.description.abstractCompared to pre-scores, mindfulness was significantly increased in both groups combined over four-weeks, indicated by significantly higher MAAS scores at mid (p
dc.description.abstractFindings indicate that both meditation types improved focus and attention and reduced perceived stress levels, suggesting useful application for nursing practice. Silent Heart Meditation may assist with transition to attentiveness and stress reduction earlier than with Zen practice.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent78 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceNursing
dc.subjectattention
dc.subjectmeditation
dc.subjectnoise-canceling headphones
dc.subjectnursing
dc.subjectsilent heart meditation
dc.subjectstress
dc.subject.lcshNursing
dc.subject.otherNursing
dc.titleExploring a Change in Meditation Practice Using Noise-Canceling Headphones
dc.typethesis


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