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Cover for Hizbullah’s Secretary General Sayyid Hasan Nasrallah and ‘What It Means To Be Lebanese’
dc.contributor.advisorSclafani, Jennifer M
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-22T13:29:41Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2017
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1050732.tar;APT-ETAG: ef0368b9166a433da7ccc21cea196af9; APT-DATE: 2019-03-05_11:33:03en_US
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents an analysis of how Hizbullah’s Secretary General Nasrallah attempts to project an alternative to existing versions of a Lebanese national identity, based on an analysis of a selection of his speeches from 2005 until 2009. Methodologies from Interactional Sociolinguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis were combined, and the theoretical framework builds upon Bakhtin’s (1981) concept of dialogicality. The data was analyzed first in view of language choice and diglossic variation, and second, in view of personal deixis in order to gain insights into intersubjectivity and positioning in Nasrallah’s speeches. The findings were then put into context with insight gained from socio-political research on Hizbullah. As a result, this study argues that Nasrallah communicates a new reading of what it means to be Lebanese, challenging existing conceptualizations of Lebanese national identity. As a secularized form of its Resistance ideology, this promoted national identity is meant to appeal to the Lebanese across sectarian divisions. In place of religion, it suggests a shared understanding of moral values. This study demonstrates - as one of its main contributions to the field of discourse analysis – that context dependency and change over time apply to not only language form, but their indexed social meanings as well. Calling for a greater degree of interdisciplinarity in the analysis of political phenomena, this study aims to show that Nasrallah’s linguistic choices help him to project a specific version of what it means to be Lebanese. However, rather than being a uniting force across a fragmented Lebanese society, this narrative instead reinforces existing boundaries. In this regard, the current study demonstrates the value a discourse linguistic approach adds to the analysis of socio-political issues.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent436 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceArabic & Islamic Studies
dc.subjectCritical Discourse Analysis
dc.subjectHizbullah
dc.subjectIndexicality
dc.subjectInteractional Sociolinguistics
dc.subjectLebanon
dc.subjectNational Identity
dc.subject.lcshLinguistics
dc.subject.lcshMiddle East -- Research
dc.subject.otherLinguistics
dc.subject.otherMiddle Eastern studies
dc.titleHizbullah’s Secretary General Sayyid Hasan Nasrallah and ‘What It Means To Be Lebanese’
dc.typethesis
gu.embargo.lift-date2020-06-22
gu.embargo.termscommon-2-years
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1496-3193


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