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Cover for Unwrapping Presence: The Impact of Cell Phones on Face-to-Face Conversations
dc.contributor.advisorTurner, Jeanine W
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-22T13:37:21Z
dc.date.available2018-06-22T13:37:21Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2018
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1050747.tar;APT-ETAG: 5520566d6b05f9469e892d259cadaff8; APT-DATE: 2019-03-22_12:23:45en_US
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.A.
dc.description.abstractUbiquitous digital devices such as cell-phones have made it easier for people to multicommunicate, or participate in multiple conversations at once. While these devices have enhanced the multicommunicative environment, they have also threatened to take away from some of the key interpersonal elements of face-to-face (FtF) conversation, such as the ability to listen and pay attention. While un-interrupted FtF conversation provides the opportunity for individuals to form closer bonds of intimacy with their conversation partner, the presence of cell-phones within such interactions now creates a challenge where individuals must compete for the attention and presence of their partner. The theory of attentional social presence proposes that communicators attempt to secure the attention of their conversation partner through four types of presence: budgeted, entitled, competitive, and invitational social presence. Each type of social presence contains a different focus on cell-phone use and a specific set of motivations based off of a desired personal and relational outcome. Grounded in the theory of attentional social presence, this thesis aims to better understand how the Millennial generation navigates the four types of presence within FtF conversations, paying close attention to the relational outcomes that each presence type provides. The data collected from 23 semi-structured interviews with participants aged 18-36 suggests that one’s decision to use a certain type of attentional social presence is highly dependent on contextual factors such as relational closeness, number of conversational partners, and the topic of the conversation.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent112 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceCommunication, Culture & Technology
dc.subjectAttentional Social Presence
dc.subjectCell-phones
dc.subjectExpectancy Violations Theory
dc.subjectFace-to-Face communication
dc.subjectInterpersonal Communication
dc.subjectPoliteness Theory
dc.subject.lcshCommunication
dc.subject.lcshOral communication
dc.subject.otherCommunication
dc.titleUnwrapping Presence: The Impact of Cell Phones on Face-to-Face Conversations
dc.typethesis
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9636-1681


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