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Cover for NewSpace: An Era of Entrepreneurial Branding
dc.contributor.advisorBarba, Evan
dc.contributor.advisorShindell, Matthew
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-22T13:37:25Z
dc.date.available2018-06-22T13:37:25Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2018
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1050753.tar;APT-ETAG: da407dd9c058f91f7b9b1b99ed3a5abd; APT-DATE: 2019-03-28_10:33:17en_US
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.A.
dc.description.abstractWith the rise in space entrepreneurial companies like SpaceX and Blue Origin, the modern day space sector paradigm appears to be much different that of a NASA-led past. In the mid-90s with the rise of frustration over NASA’s perceived inability to return to the Moon or pursue a Mars mission, a number of space frontier advocates decided to take the ambition into their hands under a so-called “alt.space” turned “NewSpace” movement, which positioned NASA and its aerospace partners as slow-moving and uninspiring “OldSpace.” This thesis unpacks the rhetorical origins of this terminology and the actionable differences between the two camps, ultimately to find that NewSpace is a continuation of the traditional public-private partnership framework that NASA and the U.S. Government has pursued since before the days of Apollo. Despite this reality, so-called NewSpace companies are certainly taking over part of the messaging around how society ought to be expanding into the space frontier away from a government agency. In observing how NewSpace companies manage to rhetorically, but not effectively, brand themselves as different this research posits a question of whether there are serious implications to the intrinsic individualistic and ultimately profit-seeking motives of space entrepreneurs influencing the public’s perception of what ought to be happening in space in the place of a cautious government agency intended to serve public welfare.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent117 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceCommunication, Culture & Technology
dc.subjectcommercial space
dc.subjectNASA
dc.subjectNewSpace
dc.subjectprivate space industry
dc.subjectspace history
dc.subjectspace policy
dc.subject.lcshCommunication
dc.subject.lcshOral communication
dc.subject.lcshSocial sciences -- Research
dc.subject.lcshHistory
dc.subject.otherCommunication
dc.subject.otherSocial research
dc.subject.otherHistory
dc.titleNewSpace: An Era of Entrepreneurial Branding
dc.typethesis
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0001-9379-7837


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