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Cover for The Art of Ecological Selfing: Speculative Ecobildungsromane in Cloud Atlas and Never Let Me Go
dc.contributor.advisorShaup, Karen
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-22T13:45:22Z
dc.date.available2018-06-22T13:45:22Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2018
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.A.
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores how contemporary clone narratives explicate human-made ethical dilemmas, and how the nonhumans seem to stay in the periphery even if they appear human-like. Central to this thesis is the idea of an Ecobildungsroman: a development narrative which focuses on nonhuman subjects rather than human ones. I examine David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go in order to detail how both novels critique the traditional genre of the Bildungsroman in order to show how the category of personhood needs to be challenged in order to permit space for nonhuman personhood.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent90 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceEnglish
dc.subjectBildungsroman
dc.subjectCloud Atlas
dc.subjectEcobildungsroman
dc.subjectEcocriticism
dc.subjectHuman Cloning
dc.subjectNever Let Me Go
dc.subject.lcshBritish literature
dc.subject.lcshIrish literature
dc.subject.lcshEnglish literature
dc.subject.otherEnglish literature
dc.titleThe Art of Ecological Selfing: Speculative Ecobildungsromane in Cloud Atlas and Never Let Me Go
dc.typethesis
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-0081-869X


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