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Cover for Cure or Disease: The Civil-Military Consequences of American Foreign Military Aid
dc.contributor.advisorBennett, Andrew
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-01T17:32:59Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2018
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1051963.tar;APT-ETAG: e0e842c7a715a268c239290967a841e0; APT-DATE: 2019-03-01_10:53:47en_US
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractU.S. foreign military aid amounts to billions of dollars per year spread across nearly every nation in a variety of programs. However, the actual impact of this aid on the civil-military relations of recipient nations remains largely unexplored. This research explores whether such aid – and the associated U.S. focus on professionalization – enhances democratic civil-military relations as the U.S. military and policy-makers intend or exacerbates existing praetorian relationships and undermines democratic principles of control. I hypothesize that the U.S.-centric formula, in which technical and normative professionalization are inextricably linked, falls flat in nations with differing strategic cultures, histories, and government constructs. Using survey and interview data to focus on professional military education, I find evidence that U.S. professionalization does not effectively teach or transfer democratic norms of civilian control to either foreign officers or U.S. military members. Further case study research in Egypt and The Gambia suggests the U.S. military approach to aid actually empowers militaries and inspires individuals in praetorian states to intervene in government via military coup d’etat.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent317 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceGovernment
dc.subjectcivilian control
dc.subjectcivil-military relations
dc.subjectcoup
dc.subjectforeign aid
dc.subjectmilitary aid
dc.subjectsecurity
dc.subject.lcshInternational relations
dc.subject.lcshMilitary art and science
dc.subject.lcshPolitical Science
dc.subject.otherInternational relations
dc.subject.otherMilitary studies
dc.subject.otherPolitical science
dc.titleCure or Disease: The Civil-Military Consequences of American Foreign Military Aid
dc.typethesis
gu.embargo.lift-date2020-10-01
gu.embargo.termscommon-2-years


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