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Cover for Social Capital and the “Sidewalk Ballet”: Examining How Streetscape Development Can Influence a Neighborhood’S Social Capital
dc.contributor.advisorCarnes, Matthew
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-16T19:08:55Z
dc.date.available2019-01-16T19:08:55Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2018
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_1053054.tar;APT-ETAG: ef37964b68dfb9f33f284f04ccc9abef; APT-DATE: 2019-04-09_12:03:03en_US
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.A.
dc.description.abstractDesigning a neighborhood’s streetscape to be walkable is recognized as a successful way to encourage positive changes such as economic development, neighborhood stability, and increased social capital. My research focuses on how a walkable streetscape can influence a neighborhood's level of bridging social capital through the formation of weak social ties. I take Springwells — a Detroit neighborhood whose main street has recently received substantial streetscape improvements— as a case study. Applying criteria specific to bridging social capital (informal socialization and generalized trust) and the four criteria to measure walkability, I analyze the theoretical and actual results that an increase in walkability can have on a neighborhood’s social capital. This process brought to light the tangling of several stronger social capital determinants, which worked against the formation of bridging social capital. In sum, this thesis hopes to add to the existing research on walkability and social capital and help to reveal the gaps that exist between theory and practice in neighborhood design and community development.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent111 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceDevelopment Management & Policy Program
dc.subjectbridging social capital
dc.subjectneighborhood
dc.subjectsocial capital
dc.subjectstreetscape
dc.subjectwalkability
dc.subjectweak bonds
dc.subject.lcshPublic policy
dc.subject.lcshCity planning
dc.subject.otherPublic policy
dc.subject.otherUrban planning
dc.titleSocial Capital and the “Sidewalk Ballet”: Examining How Streetscape Development Can Influence a Neighborhood’S Social Capital
dc.typethesis


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