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Cover for The Novel of Unlearning: Education, Development, and Interracial Intimacies in Cold War Africa
dc.contributor.advisorParsons, Cóilín
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-05T15:52:17Z
dc.date.available2019-07-05T15:52:17Z
dc.date.created2019
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2019
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.A.
dc.description.abstractDevelopment, in terms of political and economic advancement, came to prominence post- World War II and in the Cold War era, establishing certain countries and cultures as “developed” and others as “underdeveloped” or “developing.” As a historically constructed discourse, development relies on a model of linear progress epitomized by Western modernity and creates a space in which only such a model can be accepted. Education for the underdeveloped subject is also a major component of this discourse, evident in international educational exchange programs during the Cold War. Such historical and social circumstances created unique conditions for subject formation that are underexplored in both development and literary studies.
dc.description.abstractFocusing on Tayeb Salih’s Season of Migration to the North (1966), Ama Ata Aidoo’s Our Sister Killjoy (1977), Chanakya Sen’s The Morning After (1973), and Nuruddin Farah’s Gifts (1992), this thesis considers how knowledge formation, the postcolonial subject, and interracial intimacies in these global Cold War-era novels resist the dominant discourse of linear development from the perspective of the underdeveloped. By historicizing these texts in the context of the Cold War and analyzing their unconventional interplay of traditional African literary conventions in the form of the Western novel, I argue that the four texts demonstrate how the African student who studies in a more developed country is made subject to the mindset of development by their education. The novels also embody an uneasy relationship to modernity and the very idea of development, through depictions of interracial, inter-developmental intimacies that are tortured, alienating, and dehumanizing. The thesis envisions how we can think about a “fiction of development” outside of the familiar form of the Bildungsroman, towards a form that addresses development by recognizing the various problems of a linear mindset on subject formation and national progress.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent85 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceEnglish
dc.subjectAfrican literature
dc.subjectCold War
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectInterracial intimacy
dc.subjectPostcolonial studies
dc.subject.lcshBritish literature
dc.subject.lcshIrish literature
dc.subject.lcshEnglish literature
dc.subject.lcshAfrican literature
dc.subject.otherEnglish literature
dc.subject.otherAfrican literature
dc.titleThe Novel of Unlearning: Education, Development, and Interracial Intimacies in Cold War Africa
dc.typethesis


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