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Cover for Uncovering the Genre of Threatening Texts: A Multilayered Corpus Study
dc.contributor.advisorZeldes, Amir
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-05T18:28:51Z
dc.date.available2019-07-05T18:28:51Z
dc.date.created2019
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2019
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.S.
dc.description.abstractThreatening communication has received research attention from the perspective of psychology and behavioral analysis for threat assessment purposes, and linguistics for pragmatics research and legal applications. While threats are dangerous in nature
dc.description.abstractand prevalent in our society, little is known about the linguistic and discursive nature of threats as a genre, and there are few studies that have empirically tested the linguistic features of threats in general (Gales, 2010; Muschalik, 2018; Nini, 2017). Exploring written threats as an underrepresented genre can help us see patterns in how these types of texts are structured and the linguistic methods people employ to perform this social action. This knowledge is not only applicable to genre studies and linguistics, but also practically useful for law enforcement, threat assessment practitioners, and forensic linguists who deal with this text type regularly. This study uses analytical tools such as the Rhetorical Structure Theory framework (Mann and Thompson, 1988) to facilitate a rhetorical analysis of the genre, and uses rhetorical relations to serve as linguistic evidence for the structuring of the texts. The study also utilizes part of speech tags and dependency syntax to explore other linguistic features of threatening texts, and compare them to text types in GUM (Georgetown University Multilayer) corpus. Lastly, this study also contributes a new corpus, CCT (Corpus of Conditional Threats), to GUM for further linguistic research on threatening communication. This multilayered approach reveals the prototypical generic structure (GSP) of written conditional threats and the distribution of its salient lexico-grammatical features. Overall, this study argues for threatening text as its own genre, and explains the flexibility of the genre
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent89 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceLinguistics
dc.subjectcorpus linguistics
dc.subjectgenre
dc.subjectmultilayercorpora
dc.subjectThreatening messages
dc.subject.lcshLinguistics
dc.subject.otherLinguistics
dc.titleUncovering the Genre of Threatening Texts: A Multilayered Corpus Study
dc.typethesis


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