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Cover for Incongruent in Identity: Estimating the Effect of Self-Reported and Legal Gender on the Transgender Public Experience
dc.contributor.advisorMorrison, Donna R
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-05T19:15:40Z
dc.date.available2019-07-05T19:15:40Z
dc.date.created2019
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2019
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.P.P.
dc.description.abstractTransgender individuals, or individuals who identify differently from the sex assigned to them at birth, typically go through a gender transition process in order to integrate into society as their correct gender. The literature holds that the transition process is comprised of three dimensions relating to social, medical, and legal transition. Empirical research has found that social and medical forms of transition reduce the likelihood a transgender person experiences mistreatment because it fosters their integration into society. The present study focuses on legal transition due to the significant lack of empirical research in this section of the gender transition literature. Legal transition comes from the government’s recognition of a transgender person’s identity through amending identity documents, such as a driver’s license or birth certificate, and is crucial for reconciling conflicting societal norms within a gender binary system. This research tests whether transgender people presenting identity documents incongruent with their actual identity more frequently experience mistreatment and builds upon past research using richer data and a more advanced methodological approach. Data come from the 2015 United States Transgender Survey, the largest survey of transgender people in history. The analysis employs instrumental variable probit regression using sex assignment at birth as an instrument for self-reported gender identity. Results provide modest evidence that the type of identity document and maltreatment matter in transgender people’s experiences accessing public accommodations. The best evidence in this research also supports the theoretical and empirical foundations of intersectionality, whereby, a transgender woman’s identity as both woman and transgender compound and may heighten her experience of maltreatment.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent55 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Management
dc.subjectidentity documents
dc.subjectinstrumental variable
dc.subjectprobit regression
dc.subjectsex assigned at birth
dc.subjecttransgender
dc.subjecttransition
dc.subject.lcshGay and lesbian studies
dc.subject.lcshSocial sciences -- Research
dc.subject.lcshLaw
dc.subject.otherLGBTQ studies
dc.subject.otherSocial research
dc.subject.otherLaw
dc.titleIncongruent in Identity: Estimating the Effect of Self-Reported and Legal Gender on the Transgender Public Experience
dc.typethesis


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