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Cover for School Choice and Student Achievement in Florida's K12 Public Schools
dc.contributor.advisorWise, Andrew
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-05T19:15:44Z
dc.date.available2019-07-05T19:15:44Z
dc.date.created2019
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2019
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.P.P.
dc.description.abstractFlorida’s K-12 public education system is considered to be one of the most open and accepting to charter school choice. Starting in the 2017-2018 school year, the state’s controlled open enrollment policy allowed charter schools to access additional capital investment funds and allowed families to choose among any of the schools in the state. In this study, I examine the correlation between school choice and student achievement by comparing counties in Florida that have experienced widespread school choice for years with those that have just been granted additional choice for the first time. My regressions show consistent and statistically significant correlation between school choice and overall student achievement on Math and ELA exams, as well as learning gains within the lowest quartile of students. I recommend several policy implications for parts of the state that are new to widespread school choice, as well as recommendations for less open states that could benefit from a freer marketplace of options for students and their families.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent48 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Management
dc.subjectK12
dc.subjectschool choice
dc.subjectstudent achievement
dc.subject.lcshPublic policy
dc.subject.otherPublic policy
dc.titleSchool Choice and Student Achievement in Florida's K12 Public Schools
dc.typethesis


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