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Cover for Hokkaido’s Indigenous People: Connecting with the Outside World
dc.contributor.otherGeorgetown University School of Foreign Service
dc.coverage.spatialAsia
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-01T18:19:34Z
dc.date.available2019-08-01T18:19:34Z
dc.date.created2019
dc.date.issued
dc.identifier.issn2376-8010
dc.identifier.uri
dc.description.abstractJapan is known for being one of the most homogenous societies, with a strong sense of nationalism, and little to no ethnic and cultural diversity. This is because Japan has made an extensive effort in eradicating the cultural distinction posed by ethnic minority groups, such as the Ainu people. After decades of forced assimilation and discriminatory policies, the Japanese government has finally taken major steps to fully recognize and protect the indigenous Ainu people. The Journal is honored to have Masako Kubota, an adjunct professor at Florida International University (FIU), to highlight the untold story of the Ainu people.
dc.format.extentvolumes
dc.format.mediumtext
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherGeorgetown University. School of Foreign Service. Asian Studies Program.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGeorgetown Journal of Asian Affairs, volume 5
dc.subject.lccDS33.3
dc.subject.lcshAsia -- Periodicals.
dc.titleHokkaido’s Indigenous People: Connecting with the Outside Worlden_US
dc.typearticle


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