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Cover for Foreign Direct Investment and Soft Power: How U.S. Leadership Impacts Foreign Investment in the United States
dc.contributor.advisorWise, Andrew S
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-30T19:56:30Z
dc.date.available2020-06-30T19:56:30Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2020
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.P.P.
dc.description.abstractSince 2006, the United States has been the world’s largest recipient of foreign direct investment (“FDI”). However, the United States experienced a 40 percent decrease in FDI inflow from 2016 to 2017, coinciding with the change in administration in Washington. This paper looks at the effects of the United States’ soft power on FDI inflows to the United States. To quantify soft power, I use a Gallup survey in which participants in over 157 countries were asked whether they “approve or disapprove of the leadership of” the United States. Using panel data by host country from 2006 to 2017, I estimate OLS and fixed effects models and find that there is likely a significant positive relationship between FDI and soft power. While my models have limitations and more analysis is warranted, I conclude that FDI inflows to the United States increase as a host country’s opinion of U.S. leadership increases.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent45 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Management
dc.subjectFDI
dc.subjectForeign Direct Investment
dc.subjectSoft Power
dc.subject.lcshPublic policy
dc.subject.otherPublic policy
dc.titleForeign Direct Investment and Soft Power: How U.S. Leadership Impacts Foreign Investment in the United States
dc.typethesis
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-0563-6089


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