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Cover for The Relationship Between Gentrification and Eviction Rates in Washington, D.C. Neighborhoods
dc.contributor.advisorThomas, Adam
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-30T19:57:26Z
dc.date.available2020-06-30T19:57:26Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2020
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionM.P.P.
dc.description.abstractEvictions are commonplace in the United States and are associated with significant negative outcomes in terms of the health, financial wellbeing, and housing stability of the evicted. Housing market pressure driven by gentrification represents a mechanism through which evictions might occur. This thesis examines the relationship between gentrification and eviction rates in Washington, D.C., a city experiencing one of the highest gentrification rates in the U.S. I use census data and a novel court record dataset to examine the association between tract-level eviction rates and proxies for gentrification that measure changes in tracts’ economic and demographic characteristics. I find that, for originally low-income or high-share-black tracts, there is a negative relationship between these gentrification proxies and eviction rates. My findings contribute modestly to the body of literature challenging the widely held notion that gentrification causes widespread displacement.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent45 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourcePublic Policy & Policy Management
dc.subjectD.C.
dc.subjectDisplacement
dc.subjectEviction
dc.subjectGentrification
dc.subjectUrban Studies
dc.subjectWashington
dc.subject.lcshPublic policy
dc.subject.otherPublic policy
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Gentrification and Eviction Rates in Washington, D.C. Neighborhoods
dc.typethesis
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3714-5978


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