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dc.contributor.advisorCline, Erin M
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-30T19:58:39Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2020
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractThe first Pentecostal missionaries arrived in China in 1907, bringing an affective, emotional, and experiential Christian spirituality with them. This small, Holy Spirit focused Christian movement quickly grew into an indigenous Christianity, leading some scholars to suggest that Chinese Christianity is inherently Pentecostal. Pentecostalism, which is the fastest growing religious movement in the world and is projected to reach 800 million members by 2025, appears to have its largest community within China now, claiming as many as one hundred million followers. How can this be? Why has the Chinese context been so receptive to Pentecostal spirituality? What has enabled Pentecostalism to thrive, particularly compared to other religious movements that have entered China?
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I argue that two of the primary reasons why Pentecostal spirituality has flourished in China is that it (1) affirmed central values found in Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, while (2) harmonizing with Chinese “popular” religion practices, enabling Pentecostalism to take root in China. In other words, the Pentecostal spirituality propogated by missionaries, though unintentional, supported values embedded in Chinese culture through China’s religious heritage, exemplified in the texts Mengzi, Zhuangzi, and the Platform Sutra. My comparative analysis explores how these different religious values overlapped in important ways, and not how they were identical in the details.
dc.description.abstractThese shared values, however, only tell half the story––Pentecostal spiritual practice, which is Spirit (靈/灵) centered, accorded with Chinese religious practice. The congruence is particularly pronounced because Pentecostal missionaries were not educated on a normative expression of Pentecostal spirituality, largely because there is no normative Pentecostalism; thus, they included many supernatural and Spirit-centered practices as “Pentecostal.” Consequently, the Chinese people did not have to abandon their values or religious practices but rather simply reframe and bend them to a “new” source––the Holy Spirit (聖靈/圣灵). The result is a uniquely Chinese Pentecostalism that evades being reduced to “Western” models.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent338 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceTheological & Religious Studies
dc.subjectBuddhism
dc.subjectChinese "Popular" Religion
dc.subjectConfucianism
dc.subjectDaoism
dc.subjectPentecostalism
dc.subject.lcshReligion
dc.subject.lcshReligions
dc.subject.otherReligion
dc.subject.otherComparative religion
dc.titleDoes the Wind Bend or Break the Grass? A Comparative Study of Pentecostal Spirituality and Chinese Religious Thought
dc.typethesis
gu.embargo.lift-date2022-06-30
gu.embargo.termscommon-2-years
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-5631-3829


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