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Cover for The City That Care Forgot: Apartheid Health Care, Racial Health Disparity, and Black Health Activism in New Orleans, 1718-2018
dc.contributor.advisorChatelain, Marcia
dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-19T20:19:40Z
dc.date.available2020-10-19T20:19:40Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued
dc.date.submitted01/01/2020
dc.identifier.uri
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractThis work examines the apartheid health care system in New Orleans from the city's founding in 1718 through the present, addressing several research questions. What factors led to the development and perpetuation of the apartheid health care system in New Orleans? What are the connections between apartheid health care and the larger system of racist hierarchy? How has apartheid health care impacted the health of Black residents? How have Black New Orleanians fought against this system and for improved health?
dc.description.abstractThis work main's arguments can be summarized as follows. First, apartheid health care emerged as a key component of the slave-based economy, became institutionalized with the end of Reconstruction and the rise of Jim Crow, and helped support the system of segregation in the Crescent City; sadly, an apartheid health care system still exists today. Second, the medical system served white interests in ways that financially benefitted members of the medical community and both accommodated and supported the prevailing economic system and racist hierarchy from slavery, to Jim Crow, to the post WW-II liberal order of de jure segregation, and into the post-Katrina world of ascendant liberalism. Third, government policies at the local, state, and federal level helped the apartheid health care system grow and sustain. Fourth, within these shifting institutional and power structures, Black New Orleanians fought for access to health care and improved health, including carving out their own health care system, but always had to confront the limits imposed by the racist hierarchy.
dc.description.abstractUltimately, this work posits that the apartheid health care system's survival was not inevitable. Although many factors facilitated its rise and perpetuation, there were crucial turning points when the apartheid health care system could have ended. These moments occurred in the late 1860s and 70s, the late 1960s and70s, and post-Katrina, when opportunities existed to dismantle, not expand, the apartheid health care system in New Orleans. These opportunities evaporated, but only because individual actors chose to maintain the apartheid health care system.
dc.formatPDF
dc.format.extent384 leaves
dc.languageen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
dc.sourceHistory
dc.subjectApartheid Health Care
dc.subjectBlack History
dc.subjectHealth Care
dc.subjectHistory of Medicine
dc.subjectNew Orleans
dc.subject.lcshBlacks -- History
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- History
dc.subject.otherBlack history
dc.subject.otherAmerican history
dc.titleThe City That Care Forgot: Apartheid Health Care, Racial Health Disparity, and Black Health Activism in New Orleans, 1718-2018
dc.typethesis
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1605-6810


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