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dc.creatorKopelman, Loretta M.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T18:20:45Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-12T18:20:45Zen
dc.date.created2007-07en
dc.date.issued2007-07en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy 2007 July-August; 32(4): 375-394en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/511236en
dc.description.abstractA new analysis of the Best Interests Standard is given and applied to the controversy about testing children for untreatable, severe late-onset genetic diseases, such as Huntington's disease or Alzheimer's disease. A professional consensus recommends against such predictive testing, because it is not in children's best interest. Critics disagree. The Best Interests Standard can be a powerful way to resolve such disputes. This paper begins by analyzing its meaning into three necessary and jointly sufficient conditions showing it: 1. is an "umbrella" standard, used differently in different contexts, 2. has objective and subjective features, 3. is more than people's intuitions about how to rank potential benefits and risks in deciding for others but also includes evidence, established rights, duties and thresholds of acceptable care, and 4. can have different professional, medical, moral and legal uses, as in this dispute. Using this standard, support is given for the professional consensus based on concerns about discrimination, analogies to adult choices, consistency with clinical judgments for adults, and desires to preserve of an open future for children. Support is also given for parents' legal authority to decide what genetic tests to do.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageengen
dc.source307885en
dc.subjectAdultsen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectConsensusen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectDiscriminationen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subject.classificationGenetic Screening / Genetic Testingen
dc.subject.classificationMinors / Parental Consenten
dc.titleUsing the best interests standard to decide whether to test children for untreatable, late-onset genetic diseasesen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the Bioethics Research Library, Georgetown University, for the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics, a project funded by the United States National Human Genome Research Instituteen
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText Livelink Discovery Server database named GenETHX to DSpace collection GenETHX hosted by Georgetown Universityen


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