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dc.creatorBurr, J.en
dc.creatorReynolds, P.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T18:21:30Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-12T18:21:30Zen
dc.date.created2008-04en
dc.date.issued2008-04en
dc.identifierhttp://www.jmedethics.comen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medical Ethics 2008 April; 34(4): 281-284en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/512771en
dc.description.abstractThe issue of genetic inheritance, and particularly the contradictory rights of donors, recipients and donor offspring as to the disclosure of donor identities, is ethically complicated. Donors, donor offspring and parents of donor offspring may appeal to individual rights for confidentiality or disclosure within legal systems based on liberal rights discourse. This paper explores the ethical issues of non-disclosure of genetic inheritance by contrasting two principle models used to articulate the problem liberal and communitarian ethical models. It argues that whilst the latter provides a more constructive avenue to providing an ethics for donation than the competing and contradictory positions represented in a liberal rights approach, it raises issues of ethical judgement and authority that remain problematic. This ethical discussion is supported by a field study, funded by the Wellcome Trust, exploring the perceptions and experiences of recipients of donor sperm and their partners towards donor anonymity. The field study provides the empirical basis of an argument for making ethical judgements on the grounds of the community good rather than individual rights, that nevertheless recognises that both are inherently problematic.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageengen
dc.source315604en
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectCommunitarianismen
dc.subjectConfidentialityen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectDonorsen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectSpermen
dc.subjectTrusten
dc.subject.classificationConfidentialityen
dc.subject.classificationArtificial Insemination and Surrogacyen
dc.subject.classificationGenetics, Molecular Biology and Microbiologyen
dc.titleThinking ethically about genetic inheritance: liberal rights, communitarianism and the right to privacy for parents of donor insemination childrenen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the Bioethics Research Library, Georgetown University, for the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics, a project funded by the United States National Human Genome Research Instituteen
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText Livelink Discovery Server database named GenETHX to DSpace collection GenETHX hosted by Georgetown Universityen


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