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dc.creatorMarden, Emilyen
dc.creatorNelkin, Dorothyen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T18:21:37Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-12T18:21:37Zen
dc.date.created2000-05en
dc.date.issued2000-05en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMcGill Law Journal 2000 May; 45(2): 461-481en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/512997en
dc.description.abstractRecent developments in biotechnology are radically affecting the nature of reproduction and the manner in which we approach disease. In particular, germline gene therapy, or the insertion of genetic material into cells while they are developing and dividing, offers the promise of eradicating genetic defects in humans during embryonic development. In this article, the authors argue that the social and ethical implications of the developments in the field of germline gene therapy have not yet received adequate consideration. Unlike previous technologies which targeted already-developed cells, germline gene therapy can potentially correct and eliminate genetic deficiencies at the developmental stages of a cell. This raises issues of genetic enhancement beyond the therapeutic applications of this technology. However, the authors submit that an established pattern of subordinating social and ethical issues to technical and scientific debate in the regulatory arena is repeating itself in the case of discussions over germline gene therapy. The authors suggest that the American scientific regulatory process fails to fully meet the challenges of this technology, particularly because social and ethical issues are not formally considered in the existing process. They therefore suggest that American regulatory agencies should look to the approach taken by Europe with regard to germline gene therapy as an emerging technology, and that it may be necessary to incorporate effective public debate over social and ethical concerns into a regulatory process which is primarily concerned only with the efficacy of new technologies.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageengen
dc.source217952en
dc.subjectBiotechnologyen
dc.subjectCellsen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectEmbryonic Developmenten
dc.subjectGene Therapyen
dc.subjectGenetic Defectsen
dc.subjectGermline Gene Therapyen
dc.subjectNatureen
dc.subjectReproductionen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.subject.classificationGene Therapy / Gene Transferen
dc.subject.classificationEugenicsen
dc.titleDisplaced agendas: current regulatory strategies for germline gene therapyen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the Bioethics Research Library, Georgetown University, for the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics, a project funded by the United States National Human Genome Research Instituteen
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText Livelink Discovery Server database named GenETHX to DSpace collection GenETHX hosted by Georgetown Universityen


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