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dc.creatorDavis, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T18:21:38Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-12T18:21:38Zen
dc.date.created2008-06en
dc.date.issued2008-06en
dc.identifier1467-8519en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioethics 2008 June; 22(5): 258-268en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/513040en
dc.description.abstractFor now, the best way to select a child's genes is to select a potential child who has those genes, using genetic testing and either selective abortion, sperm and egg donors, or selecting embryos for implantation. Some people even wish to select against genes that are only mildly undesirable, or to select for superior genes. I call this selection drift--the standard for acceptable children is creeping upwards. The President's Council on Bioethics and others have raised the parental love objection: Just as we should love existing children unconditionally, so we should unconditionally accept whatever child we get in the natural course of things. If we set conditions on which child we get, we are setting conditions on our love for whatever child we get. Although this objection was prompted by selection drift, it also seems to cover selecting against genes for severe impairments. I argue that selection drift is not inconsistent with the ideal of unconditional parental love and, moreover, that the latter actually implies that we should practise selection drift--in other words, we should try to select potential children with the best genetic endowments. My endowment argument for the second claim works from an analogy between arranging an endowment prior to conception to fund a future child's education, and arranging a genetic endowment by selecting a potential child who already has it, where in both cases the child would not have existed without the endowment. I conclude with some programmatic remarks about the nonidentity problem.en
dc.description.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8519.2008.00628.xen
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageengen
dc.source316994en
dc.subjectAbortionen
dc.subjectAnalogyen
dc.subjectBioethicsen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectDonorsen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEmbryosen
dc.subjectEggen
dc.subjectEgg Donorsen
dc.subjectGenesen
dc.subjectGenetic Testingen
dc.subjectLoveen
dc.subjectSelective Abortionen
dc.subjectSpermen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationBioethics Commissions / Councilsen
dc.subject.classificationReproduction / Reproductive Technologiesen
dc.subject.classificationIn Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transferen
dc.subject.classificationGenetic Counseling / Prenatal Diagnosisen
dc.subject.classificationGenetic Screening / Genetic Testingen
dc.titleSelecting potential children and unconditional parental love.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the Bioethics Research Library, Georgetown University, for the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics, a project funded by the United States National Human Genome Research Instituteen
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText Livelink Discovery Server database named GenETHX to DSpace collection GenETHX hosted by Georgetown Universityen


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