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dc.creatorArdaillou, Raymonden
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T18:22:37Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-12T18:22:37Zen
dc.date.created2009-11en
dc.date.issued2009-11en
dc.identifier0001-4079en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBulletin de l'Académie nationale de médecine 2009 Nov ; 193(8): 1773-82en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/515021en
dc.descriptionTransgenic mice: a major advance in biomedical researchen
dc.description.abstractTransgenic mice bear stable, artificially induced genetic modifications that are transmitted to their offspring. They are prepared from cultured embryonic stem cells isolated from blastocysts. The stem cells are then transfected with a vector comprising a selection cassette and the sequence to be introduced, modified or suppressed, lying between two sequences identical to those flanking the target gene. The target gene is thereby "knocked out" and replaced by the selection cassette, through homogeneous recombination. Cells in which recombination has successfully taken place are sorted by detecting the selection cassette, and are injected into an embryo. This results in so-called mosaic mice which, after crossing, will give birth to mice that are either heterozygous or homozygous for the knocked out gene. A variety of genomic modifications can be obtained with this approach, including gene knock-out, insertion of multiple gene copies, introduction of a reporter gene under the control of the promoter of the gene of interest, and "conditional" mutations that are expressed in a given tissue or for a specific period of time. Transgenic mice can be used to examine the phenotype resulting from a null mutation or from the introduction of multiple gene copies, as well as factors controlling the synthesis of a specific protein, the phenotypic consequences of point mutations, and the genes involved in embryo development. Institutes have been created specifically to phenotype transgenic mice, frequently using non invasive techniques. The results thus obtained are collected in databases, thus allowing scientists to determine the minimal number of animals necessary for a given experiment.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languagefreen
dc.source327864en
dc.subjectBlastocystsen
dc.subjectCellsen
dc.subjectDatabasesen
dc.subjectEmbryonic Stem Cellsen
dc.subjectGenesen
dc.subjectMiceen
dc.subjectMutationen
dc.subjectPhenotypeen
dc.subjectStem Cellsen
dc.subject.classificationGenetics, Molecular Biology and Microbiologyen
dc.subject.classificationAnimal Experimentationen
dc.title= Les souris transgéniques: un progrès dans la recherche biomédicale.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the Bioethics Research Library, Georgetown University, for the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics, a project funded by the United States National Human Genome Research Instituteen
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText Livelink Discovery Server database named GenETHX to DSpace collection GenETHX hosted by Georgetown Universityen


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