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dc.creatorBrassington, Iainen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-12T18:23:11Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-12T18:23:11Zen
dc.date.created2011-04en
dc.date.issued2011-04en
dc.identifier1573-0980en
dc.identifier10.1007/s11017-010-9145-xen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTheoretical medicine and bioethics 2011 Apr; 32(2): 101-15en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/516196en
dc.description.abstractQuestions about information inform many debates in bioethics. One of the reasons for this is that at least some level of information is taken by many to be a prerequisite of valid consent. For others, autonomy in the widest sense presupposes information, because one cannot be in control of one's life without at least some insight into what it could turn out to contain. Yet not everyone shares this view, and there is a debate about whether or not there is a right to remain in ignorance of one's medical, and especially genetic, information. It is notable, though, that this debate leaves unexamined the assumption that, if a person wants information, he is entitled to it. This paper examines the assumption, specifically in relation to genetics, where learning facts about oneself may reveal facts about other people, particularly one's close relatives. This may be taken as a violation of their privacy, and since privacy is something that we normally think should be respected, it is worth asking whether one ought to abjure the opportunity to obtain genetic information for the sake of privacy. In effect, there may be an argument to be made not just for a right to remain in ignorance, but for a duty to do so.en
dc.description.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11017-010-9145-xen
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageengen
dc.source338343en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBioethicsen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectGenetic Informationen
dc.subjectGeneticsen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectRelativesen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationTruth-tellingen
dc.subject.classificationConfidentialityen
dc.subject.classificationGenetics, Molecular Biology and Microbiologyen
dc.titleIs there a duty to remain in ignorance?en
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the Bioethics Research Library, Georgetown University, for the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics, a project funded by the United States National Human Genome Research Instituteen
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText Livelink Discovery Server database named GenETHX to DSpace collection GenETHX hosted by Georgetown Universityen


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