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Cover for Aging and Second Language Acquisition: Differential Success in Learning Latin Grammar Via Implicit and Explicit Feedback
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dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T20:24:33Zen
dc.date.available2011-11-23T20:24:33Zen
dc.date.created2008-04-20en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_551680.tar;APT-ETAG: 3af22f56897e8405f2f330f44cd2880ben
dc.identifier.urien
dc.description.abstractThe ability to learn a second language becomes difficult for adults, but not impossible. While implicit processes that can contribute to acquisition of syntax are relatively spared in aging, there are marked deficits in explicit learning, suggesting that language instructions calling on implicit learning might be more effective than that based on explicit learning for older adults. In this experiment, 20 adults ages 66-81 were taught aspects of Latin grammar with either implicit or explicit feedback and were compared to a group of college-age students who previously completed the same task. Overall, the results suggest that the implicit method of teaching the grammar worked better for the older adults but this was not the case for the students. Furthermore, limited exposure to high school Latin markedly increased the ability of older adults to learn the grammar. There were no significant age deficits in learning when only those without previous Latin experience were compared, which bodes well for older adults with strong motivations to learn a second language.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subject.otherAgingen
dc.subject.otherSecond Languageen
dc.subject.otherAcquisitionen
dc.titleAging and Second Language Acquisition: Differential Success in Learning Latin Grammar Via Implicit and Explicit Feedbacken
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