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dc.contributor.otherBecker, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.otherSantoli, Alen
dc.coverage.spatialAsiaen
dc.coverage.spatialSoutheast Asiaen
dc.coverage.spatialCambodiaen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T22:50:28Zen
dc.date.available2012-01-20T22:50:28Zen
dc.date.created1983-05-31en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_552628.tar;APT-ETAG: 9f0a66eec8d975eac03bd766bc568e58-14; APT-DATE: 2017-05-19_13:13:04en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionFollowing the collapse of the American-backed government in 1975, Cambodia fell under the brutal rule of Pol Pot and the Cambodian Communists, the Khmer Rouge. Over the next four years Cambodia was a nation gripped by fear and death, as more than one million people lost their lives to executions or famine in what the United Nations called the worst genocide to take place since Nazi Germany. In 1978 Vietnam launched a full-scale invasion of Cambodia, driving the Khmer Rouge from power. At first Cambodians greeted the Vietnamese as liberators, but soon it became clear that the only focus of the Vietnamese-installed puppet government, which renamed the country Kampuchea, was advancing the national interest of Vietnam, and not rebuilding the war-torn country. In the aftermath of the Vietnamese invasion the Khmer Rouge remerged as part of a tripartite coalition fighting against the Vietnamese occupation. With civil war raging and Cambodian society in taters, hundreds of thousands of refugees fled the fighting and hunger, creating massive logistic and political problems for Cambodia's neighbors. In this episode, Elizabeth Becker of the Washington Post and Vietnam expert Al Santoli discuss the Vietnamese-installed regime in Phnom Penh, the situation on the ground in Cambodian refugee camps, and the American interest in resolving the Cambodian conflict.en
dc.description.abstractExamines the problem of refugees and the Khmer Rouge in Vietnam-occupied Cambodia (Kampuchea).en
dc.format.extent28 min.en
dc.format.mediumMPG4 H.264en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherJefferson Communications Inc.en
dc.publisherGeorgetown University. School of Foreign Serviceen
dc.relationDean Peter Krogh Foreign Affairs Digital Archiveen
dc.relation.urihttps://mediapilot.georgetown.edu/ssdcms/i.do?u=05b002fa90894b4en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/en
dc.sourceAmerican Interests (show 230)en
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Foreign relations -- Cambodiaen
dc.subject.lcshCambodia -- History -- 1975-1979en
dc.subject.lcshCambodia -- History -- 1979-en
dc.subject.lcshGenocide -- Cambodiaen
dc.subject.lcshCambodia -- Politics and government -- 1975-1979en
dc.subject.lcshCambodia -- Foreign relations -- United Statesen
dc.subject.otherHuman Rightsen
dc.subject.otherKampucheaen
dc.subject.otherPol Poten
dc.subject.otherKhmer Rougeen
dc.subject.otherCambodian-Vietnamese Waren
dc.subject.otherSee Anoken
dc.subject.otherHun Sanen
dc.subject.otherCambodian Genocideen
dc.titleNever again? : genocide in Cambodiaen
dc.contributor.repositoryDigitalGeorgetown
dc.rights.noteFor more information about copyright for materials within DigitalGeorgetown, please consult https://www.library.georgetown.edu/copyright/digitalgeorgetown.


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