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dc.contributor.otherHolbrooke, Richarden
dc.contributor.otherAllen, Richard V.en
dc.contributor.otherHouse, Karen Elliotten
dc.coverage.spatialAsiaen
dc.coverage.spatialSoutheast Asiaen
dc.coverage.spatialCambodiaen
dc.coverage.spatialVietnamen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-20T22:50:31Zen
dc.date.available2012-01-20T22:50:31Zen
dc.date.created1990en
dc.date.issueden
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_552701.tar;APT-ETAG: 0b6d9c6afa2063391cde58a96b950121; APT-DATE: 2017-05-31_16:43:14en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionAs the United States sought to normalize relations with Vietnam nearly 15 years after the end of the Vietnam War, civil war continued to rage in neighboring Cambodia. Following the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam, communist despot Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouge overthrew the U.S. backed government in Cambodia, leading to a period of social revolution in which nearly one quarter of Cambodia’s population lost their lives to the brutal regime or famine. Within four years Vietnam had invaded Cambodia, driving the Khmer Rouge into the jungle and quickly establishing a puppet government. In 1979 the Khmer Rouge remerged as part of a tripartite coalition of guerilla factions to wage war against the Vietnamese installed government. Despite the Khmer Rouge’s prominent role as the most powerful of the three groups, this coalition was recognized by the United States and a majority of UN member states as the legitimate government of Cambodia. The withdrawal of Vietnam’s remaining forces in the fall of 1989 posed a new challenge for the international community- how to peacefully install a new non-communist government in Cambodia without allowing the genocidal Pol Pot to regain power. In this episode, the panel of foreign policy specialists discusses the Khmer Rouge’s role in Cambodian politics, as well as the feasibility of any potential power sharing arrangement that would exclude the Khmer Rouge from post-Vietnamese government. Featuring former National Security Advisor Richard Allen, Karen Elliott House of the Wall Street Journal, and former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Richard Holbrooke.en
dc.description.abstractExamines American policy towards Cambodian and the return of the Khmer Rouge.en
dc.format.extent28 min.en
dc.format.mediumMPG4 H.264en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherConnecticut Public Televisionen
dc.publisherWorld Beat Associatesen
dc.publisherGeorgetown University. School of Foreign Serviceen
dc.publisherForeign Policy Associationen
dc.relationDean Peter Krogh Foreign Affairs Digital Archiveen
dc.relation.urihttps://mediapilot.georgetown.edu:443/sharestream2gui/getMedia.do?action=streamMedia&mediaPath=0d21b6201b9d49a9011b9e0ab3170008&cid=0d21b62018c663370119bf04f6be0a8ben
dc.sourceGreat Decisions 1990 (program 4)en
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Foreign relations -- Vietnamen
dc.subject.lcshVietnam -- Foreign relations -- United Statesen
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Foreign relations -- Cambodiaen
dc.subject.lcshCambodia -- Foreign relations -- United Statesen
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Foreign relations -- 1989-en
dc.subject.otherHuman Rightsen
dc.subject.otherPol Poten
dc.subject.otherKhmer Rougeen
dc.subject.otherCambodian-Vietnamese Waren
dc.subject.otherHun Sanen
dc.titleVietnam, Cambodia, and the United States : return engagementen
dc.title.alternativeVietnam, Cambodia and the U.S. : return engagementen


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